EUROMOD statistics for Portugal

EUROMOD is continually being improved and updated and the results presented here represent work in progress. The current release of Statistics is using EUROMOD version H1.0+ (last updated 17/01/2018).

The base dataset for EUROMOD for Portugal is EU-SILC 2015-1. The year of collection and income reference period is 2015, and the simulated policy years are 2014-2017.

Main statistics

1

Notes:

(1) The categories of income components chosen for these tables are simply for illustrative purposes. The categorisation of instruments is an area where EUROMOD offers a high degree of flexibility which is needed if results are to conform to different conventions and are to be used for a range of purposes. June 2014-2017 market exchange rates are used for non-euro countries.

(2) Social insurance contributions refer here to the sum of employee and self-employed contributions and all benefits also include public pensions.

(3) Poor: households at risk of being in poverty, i.e., with equivalised disposable income below 60% of the median.

1,5

2

Note: The Atkinson index (also known as the Atkinson measure or Atkinson inequality measure) is a measure of income inequality that allows for varying sensitivity to inequalities in different parts of the income distribution. It incorporates a sensitivity parameter (A) for which the higher the value, the more sensitive the Atkinson index becomes to inequalities at the bottom of the income distribution.

3

Notes:

The tables show what happens to the Gini coefficient of disposable income if each income component is added back (in the case of taxes) or deducted (in the case of benefits), in turn.

Changes between years and tax-benefit components are not necessarily statistically significant.

In the calculation of the Gini coefficients negative income has been recoded to zero.

4

Note: Poverty risk is the percentage of people in households with equivalised disposable income below the national poverty threshold. The poverty threshold is 60% of the median equivalised disposable income.

5

Note: The relative median poverty gap is the difference of the poverty threshold and the median equivalised income of persons in households with income below the poverty threshold, expressed as a proportion of the poverty threshold. The poverty threshold is 60% of the median equivalised disposable income.

6

Notes:

(1) Poverty thresholds are set at 60% of the median equivalised household disposable income, which is formed using the modified OECD equivalence scale and weighted by household size.

(2) June 2014-2017 market exchange rates are used for non-euro countries.

 

 

 

 

7

 

 

 

 

 

Note: METRs are calculated for all individuals with earned income, taking account of the effect of earning 3% more such income (in gross terms) on their household disposable income. The calculations include some zero values (e.g. for people earning small amounts, below tax and contribution thresholds and in households with other income, making them ineligible for any means-tested benefit that might be withdrawn). They also include some very high values, exceeding 100%, corresponding to situations where people are near discontinuities in the tax-benefit schedules.

8

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note: (1) Population figures correspond to the EU-SILC datasets used for each policy year.